The link 'Look up in JPL Small Bodies database' in the 'single image exposures does not work properly/ is extremely slow

Hello,

When you click on the link: ‘Look up in JPL Small Bodies database’ in the ‘single image exposures’ it is very slow and mosly you got a 504 gateway time out.
Can this be fixed? Thanks.

Ine :stars::dizzy:

Hi,
You can use the “Direct link” to go there directly, rather than having legacysurvey.org try to fetch it for you and display the result. However, for me right now, the JPL page is not loading. There is nothing I can do about that aside from reporting it to them…
cheers,
dustin

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I can directly use the Small Body Identification Tool. I know that. But it is quite time consuming because you have to enter a lot of data manually and you also have to convert coordinates.

Ine :stars::dizzy:

The “Direct link” fetches the same URL that the “Direct link to JPL query” does, except there is no timeout. It’s slow because the JPL form is slow.

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Also, you can email them at contact-ssd@jpl.nasa.gov

This is a what I got if I click on the link ‘direct link to JPL query’ (see image below).

Btw The link to simbad doesn’t work either. The page won’t load when you click on an object’s name. :slightly_frowning_face:
(Also see images below)

Ine :stars::dizzy:

Hi Ine,

Yes, that JPL output is what is expected… it’s a JSON-format output meant to be parsed by a machine…

I see that the legacysurvey.org “Look up on JPL…” link times out after 180 seconds, but I’m not sure how to increase that limit!

I cannot do anything about problems within the Simbad site :slight_smile:

cheers,
dustin

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For what it’s worth, I wrote to the JPL folks asking if there was anything I could do to improve my queries, and I got a kind reply,

There’s no easy way to increase the speed required to numerically integrate potentially many hundreds of thousands of orbits. There is already a first-pass that attempts to reduce the number of orbits to integrate using 2-body dynamics with conservatively large uncertainties. The API’s timeout of 180 seconds has been increased to 300 seconds. Let me know if you continue to have timeouts and whether they are on the client side or our server/API side. The time required for this tool will only increase in the future as new large-scale surveys come online such as LSST and the number of asteroids increases by an order of magnitude or so.

cheers,
dustin

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Hello Ine, it is working fine for me. Are you still having trouble? SIMBAD is also working fine for me especially on the Mobile version.

Especially for the JPL minor body database, I get timed out as well, happens before you post and even when I first clicked the look up button. so, you would have to look it up manually.

I am continuing to get error 504 when reaching the JPL lookup. Nothing I or Dustin could fix it because Dustin has no access to fix bugs on the minor body lookup. The admins would only fix this.

it is most likely something to do with their servers linked to the JPL minor body lookup.

EDIT: Exactly what I got.

Thank you for your replies and help Chris and Dustin.

Kind regards from Ine :stars::dizzy:

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I know I should be asking this at JPL and not here, but I’m a bit confused; what is the function of a time-out anyway?

If it takes a long time to calculate the time-out adds nothing really, especially if the calculation time will only increase in the future. Worst case scenario no one will get a solution anymore because the calculation time will always exceed the set time-out

Or is this dependent on the set-up from the person doing the request?

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Your last question is part of what I was trying to ask them :slight_smile: I guess I could try a smaller search radius and find out!

Timeouts are usually added when you’re gluing two systems together: a web server to an orbit integrator, for example. Usually a web server can only have so many sessions open, so it should give up at some point, otherwise new user requests will get no response and the site will be offline. But agreed, timing out should be a rare outcome because of some unexpected issue.

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