Very Bright Galaxy Core

https://www.legacysurvey.org//viewer/?ra=353.3780&dec=-42.5773&layer=ls-dr10&zoom=13&const
Now THAT’s a bright nucleus. Not sure if VLASS is down or just doesn’t cover this piece of sky…

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Too far south for VLASS :frowning:

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DEC -40 if I’m correct for VLASS

Any further South you can use ASKAP / MOLONGLO sky surveys (also further up than Dec -40), they have their own viewer somewhere…. Based on Aladin Sky Atlas software

(Coordinate input was iffy, had to recheck + relocate visually comparing optical surveys to get to the correct object)

Might have been this one, buried in the internet , top left layer symbol you can choose RACS (ASKAP) or SUMMS (Molonglo), but with coordinate input be sure to compare locations with visual counterparts between Legacy viewer / Aladin DSS and in this viewer (DSS) to make sure its the correct location, cumbersome but needed…)

https://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/RACS/RACS_I1/index.html

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Thanks so much AFJ!

Seems like a pretty significant signature no?
Screen Shot 2023-02-20 at 3.47.38 PM

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Oooh nice, radio astronomy is so weird and alien! Looks like two lobes but in the same direction or something?? I’m not familiair with Radio Galaxy Zoo designations but I believe they have names for types where the lobes seem to encounter matter / stuff and are ‘pushed away’

Also I’m often blown away when comparing a radio image of a radio galaxy with optical / near IR, sometimes a big galaxy is like a speck compared to the lobes o_O

Quick use of the link btw : )

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owww my eyes!!!

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Radio astronomy is very very weird. stuff comes out of nowhere with nothing visually and then massive, close galaxies have little to no radio signal. Would love to understand more tbh.

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