Interesting object

https://www.legacysurvey.org//viewer/?ra=32.8140&dec=3.8478&layer=sdss&zoom=14&photoz-dr9

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I have an alternative explanation. This object appears only in SDSS, not in LS-DR10 (which is deeper / more sensitive), and has a slight green-red-blue beach-ball gradient. That pattern is typical of moving objects, because SDSS measured the different bands within a few minutes of each other, in that order (r-i-u-z-g bands, which become G, R, -, -, B in the RGB image). So moving objects (asteroid) become beach-balls because they move a bit during that few minutes.

cheers,
dustin

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That’s incredibly helpful and should teach me to check before I post. Thank you for that information.

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For legacy images you can follow the (automated query) link to JPL from the single images page to perform a check for asteroids and perhaps find the correct name.

For SDSS you have to fill in the JPL query from scratch, and I’m not going through that agony again :wink:

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Ok. Thanks.

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Much easier to do an MPC query than JPL probably haha

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Great info @AFJ

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Perhaps, its been a few years since I’ve done it and might be confusing sources, but I only remember JPL…

So I’ve probably only used JPL in the past for asteroid checks (SDSS), but as far as I can see the JPL minor body database and the IAU Minor Planet Center essentially perform the same service / ephemerides / database?

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MPC is pretty easy. Just need the rough coords, date/time of exposure & observatory code.

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But it’s the same objects / ephemerides etc etc? Just easier to use?

Yeh it’ll have the same objects.