Blue lights

https://www.legacysurvey.org//viewer/?ra=57.8955&dec=-27.7421&layer=ls-dr9&zoom=15
In single exposures it seems transient. Not really sure what these are. A lot going on here.

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This looks to me (just a guess) like the very beginnings of a star forming region. It is almost like an eliptical galaxy is starting to form arms.

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So, when you’re looking at the single exposures, they are sorted first by band (g, r, i, z), then by date. So something like this that is very blue will probably appear strongest in g band, and fainter in the other bands. That looks like what’s going on here – so not a transient, but very blue! One way you can get things that are very strongly one color is if there is an emission line that falls in that band.
cheers,
-dustin

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Oh wow!

Look at that stunning VTO! (voorwerp-type object) but the sad thing is that this is known already in the Voorwerpje Hunt thread.

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Definitely hard to miss if you see the galaxy. It looked odd.

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That is really interesting. And a good learning moment. This particular galaxy being a good model for that. I had actually thought whatever it was being a contender for the bluest object. As an Artist who paints. I deal with mixing color and attempting to identify colors going into an object I am painting. Some greens having red in them etc. I do this semi regularly in my day to day activities for the heck of it. I think it helps to some regard on this Legacy Survey.

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I was just thinking again about the blue. It is hypothesized that up to six primary colors exist of which most of us can see 3 or trichromatic. Some less dichromatic aka colorblind. But there are known to be folks who are tetrachromatic and see 4 primary colors and can see a billion hues to our million, dichromes only 10,000. All of the known tetrachromes have been women, whos Father was colorblind. Alexander’s Dark Band is the invisible light. This screen an RGB doesnt have the capacity to show me its true color nor the colors I am blind to. It may be be 4th and 5th primary as well.

@ChristineM I appreciate the paper on ionizing gas. The photos reminded me of this I had previously posted to discussion.

How we see colour is an interesting topic. The only real way to “see” colour is by taking spectrum. Anything else is an approximation, limited by our biology and technology.
You could take a look at my explanation

Learn Astrophysics - redshift and spectral charts
Easy. Really.
https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zookeeper/galaxy-zoo/talk/1268/582784

The explanation about perceiving colour is near the end, though it seems you already know lots about it.

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I will read this all. Thank you for it. Color perception interests me a lot. In addition to being a oil painter and Artist. I was the one to discover my Dad was red/green color blind in my mid 30s. He had no idea. A lot of my childhood made since. I had suspected it as a kid, but thought since I could see it my Dad couldnt be color blind. But he sure is. I discovered one beautiful sunset when the whole sky was pink. My Dad could only see gray, I tested him after that with a 1940 pseudo-isochromatic plate book for testing color perception to prove it. They say the Universe is so infinite that there is another me out there in space and time. I imagine that other me can only see the other 3 primary colors. Oblivious to Red, Blue, Yellow & their hues.