Big SN maybe

https://www.legacysurvey.org//viewer/?ra=49.0806&dec=-15.5132&layer=ls-dr9&zoom=16
While attempting to rediscover the SN I lost last night I found this candidate.

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It appears in exposures thousands of days apart. Best guess is foreground star.

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Hi,

Always check the SDSS layer. If it is visible in the Legacy Survey/ DECaLS layers and also in the SDSS layer at the same time, it cannot be a supernova candidate because SDSS is a survey from more than 10 years ago.

Either it must only be visible in the LegacySurvey/DECaLS layers and not in SDDS or visible in SDSS but not in the other layers for it to be a supernova candidate.

Check always if it is an asteroid or not.
If the blob is only visible in one ‚Äėsingle image exposure‚Äô or in several ‚Äėsingle image exposures‚Äô of the same date with only a few minutes apart, you are probably dealing with an asteroid.

You can manually check whether it is an asteroid or not via the link below. Or you click on the jpl link that belongs to the ‚Äėsingle image exposure‚Äô to find out.

Sometimes a blob is visible in only one ‚Äėsingle image exposure‚Äô. This is not enough to determine if it is a supernova candidate or not. If the possibility of an asteroid is ruled out then you could check the PanSTARRS Survey to see if ‚Äėsingle image exposures‚Äô are available there from different dates.

Ine :stars::dizzy:

https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/tools/sb_ident.html#/

https://ps1images.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/ps1cutouts?pos=192.4650107052575+0.198246&filter=color&filter=g&filter=r&filter=i&filter=z&filter=y&filetypes=stack&auxiliary=data&size=240&output_size=0&verbose=0&autoscale=99.500000&catlist=

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